Get started in small-scale food manufacturing

  

Fixtrade, a South Africa-based producer of stainless steel equipment, is offering entrepreneurs in Africa the opportunity to start their own small-scale food manufacturing businesses.

Entrepreneurs can produce their own yogurt using Fixtrade's state-of-the-art equipment.

Entrepreneurs can produce their own yogurt with Fixtrade's state-of-the-art equipment.

Fixtrade has developed a range of small food production “factories” that will enable entrepreneurs to get started right away.

Fixtrade manufactures all the equipment needed for the following businesses:

  • Dairy (milk, cheese, yogurt)
  • Dairy feed
  • Poultry
  • Ice lollies
  • Pop corn
  • Still/flavoured bottled water
  • Juice
  • Corn snacks (Nik Naks)
  • Archar
  • Bakery

The company has been involved with the establishment of various successful businesses across the continent. “In Botswana we’ve supplied a yogurt and sour milk factory; in Zambia a company bought our equipment to produce milk, sour milk and a bit of cheese; and we were also involved with two large dairies for the King of Swaziland. In addition we’ve also supplied a number of projects in Zimbabwe and Mozambique,” says Anton Gilfillan, managing director of Fixtrade.

Fixtrade manufactures 80% of its equipment at its facility in South Africa. Finished product ingredients and inputs are also available from South Africa. All equipment can be exported anywhere in the continent.

Entrepreneurs will also be provided with assistance in the various aspects of establishing a business, including:

  • Planning of business
  • Business plan
  • Equipment
  • Training
  • Packaging
  • Marketing strategies

Contact details
For more information about Fixtrade’s products, or to request a quote, contact Anton Gilfillan at:

Email: info@centralmilk.com

Websites:
www.fix-trade.co.za
www.centralmilk.com


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